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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
combat. at the time only one in four u.s. bombers in missions over germany came home safely. >> mayhem was a bomb dore who escaped from the prison camp run by naziicism thosing prison guards. >> they slipped on lois infested straws and sowage in the area and solitary confinement and starvation and mental terror. >> a historic injustice was reversed. the eight remaining survivors out of the pow's imprisonned in switzerland were honored by the air force. >> it is the kind of courage we read about in books. their stories would not have been known without dwight ma er whose grandfather was imprisonned in the prison camp. >> to have it denied and irrespectivee?'Ñ of the treatm did not so many right. >> congress revised a 1985 law on pow medals and requiring prisoners to be held in enemy territory. lieutenant was moved. his son patrick accompanied him to the ceremony. >> every day for the rest of his life was a gift. he was never in a bad mood. >> that attitude and the grandsons pursuit of justice is the reason they finally received the recognition they were denied more than cent years. in
and others. and in germany. >> family members are outraged. they were hurt that these support centers are closing in by a jenning but at some point, an airline has to say, we don't have any more information, right, we have to do this or is this timing particularly bad? >> well, the timing is particularly bad because there is still for the answers where their loved ones are. but in most air crash accidents, certainly all the ones i have worked on, the airline usually closes down its support system and they have a care team assigned member assigned to each family. they cut that off at about day 45 and that's pretty standard and the reason is, that is in most cases, the case is moving on to a different stage, here because they don't have a plane or their loved ones, it's particularly bad timing. it's not unusual to close it down about this point. >> oh, boy, thanks so much to both of you. appreciate it. >> already. the other woman in this clipper owners scandal is talking. what she told barra walters about her relationship with donald sterling and whether she thinks she a racist. first,
germany, make it hard for them to accept tougher economic sanctions. but this is where you need american leadership. the fact is that what putin has succeeded in doing is using military force to change international boundaries on the continent of europe. and if the europeans don't realize it, that puts them in considerable jeopardy. the european union is still on very shaky foundations when it comes to the monetary union, political tensions are rising. and putin is taking advantage of them. i think this is a very bad time for the western alliances. >> right. and historically, we have seen this happen in the past, going back to world war ii, beginning stages of that. let's go further. what does the united states have to do to show american leadership and intervene in this difficult situation in ukraine and russia? >> well, i think you've got to do two things. number one, you've got to turn up the cost to russia of this belligerent policy its pursuing. if the europeans are serious about wanting peace and stability on the european continent, they've got to risk economic harm to themselves i
to be making much of a difference and now you've got the white house and you've got germany and other members of the european union who are threatening more sanctions. how might that really impact the situation there? >> well, sanctions need to do two things. one, they need to punish the russians for the actions that they've already taken in annexing crimea, illegally, totally unprovoked. the second thing they need to deter the russians from further action. the russians have already gone beyond crimea. they've already sent their special forces into eastern ukraine to stir up trouble, and that's the trouble you're seeing now in eastern ukraine. it is only in eastern ukraine where the russians sent in their special forces that there's any difficulty around that country, around ukraine. the rest of the country is calm. so the sanctions which should go into effect now, the elevated sanctions, the harsher sanctions are necessary now, not waiting for two more weeks. >> the u.s., president obama had been meeting and talking with angela merkel. germany has some leverage in all this, doesn't it? it se
to one boss who says he is hiring right now. also what america could learn from germany about jobs and training skilled workers. plus prayers and property, i'll show you how the real estate market has been a blessing for churches looking to sell. i'm ali velshi, and this is "real money." >> this is "real money," you are the most important part of the show so tell me what is on your mind tweet me or go to facebook. i do read this stuff. the economy added 288,000 new jobs in april most of them came from the private sector. economists hope for 150 or 200,000 new jobs to get added every month just to keep up with new entrants to the job market. so the fact that we overshot that in april is really good news, and april has been a big acceleration from the prior months. another positive the number of long-term unemployed came down in april by 287,000. now i always say ignore the unemployment rate unless it's convenient for me to help tell a story. focus instead on that, the number of jobs added every month. in april the rate dropped .4 of a percentage point the lowest in 5.5 years. over t
personal relationship with merkel and a strong u.s. alliance with germany. he tried to assure germans that regular citizens are not subject to surveillance. >> what i've tried odo is take the unprecedented step of ordering our intelligence communities to take the privacy of of normal u.s. dissention into everything they do. >> the president saying the u.s. doesn't have such an arrangement with any of its closest partners. >> david, the story is that you were talking about an agreement along these lines and then pulled back on it. the president said no we never had that as a plan. while we are interested in some intelligence sharing, privacy-sharing, we'll see how that plays out, because many of the reporters from germany are very interested on the u.s. position on spying and how chancellor merkel is was responding to the president's words. >> lobby, be merkel having the most contact with the russian president did she havefully sense? >> can be found but she was putting sanctions on the table and she was talking about next steps. she like president obama holdings out these late may ele
in germany are not favorably seen, at least by the german business lobby. let's get to john harwood at the white house with more. john? >> not seen positively by the german business community or the business community elsewhere in europe, but i expect them to talk about trying to maintain a united front on sanctions. the nsa. they will have a news conference, a press availability after their meeting around 11:45 and i think you can also expect, carl, the president to have some sort of remarks off the top about these stronger than expected jobs numbers. >> all right. john, we'll come back to you for that later this morning. john harwood at the white house. another sign of the economic recovery. the ceo of host hotels, the country's largest lodging reit, says group bookings are up. he'll join us live in just a few minutes. later on, the ceo of expedia will join us with the first reaction to earnings last night. a lot more "squawk on the street" with dows close to session highs up 48. ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so
point ceases to be in the interests of the german government. germany gets a third of its oil and gas from russia and some of germany's best-known companies, volkswagen for one, have huge stakes in russia. so any type of sanction has a potential economic blowback and it's just a sign of how the west has a limited toolbox in dealing with the situation in ukraine, chris. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for the reporting. >>> let's bring in cnn military analyst james "spider" marks a retired major generally and former commanding general of the u.s. army intillgence center. general, thank you for joining us. let's leave the politics aside and deal with the urgency on the ground. what do you believe the situation is? who is ukraine fighting? what do you think the stakes are? >> fighting two elements really. you do have pro-russian separatists that are in east ukraine, but they're being supported directly, not only in terms of what i would call over-the-horizon support, weapons support, but also they have russian forces are on the ground instigating this and these are the folks we've
exports gas into the eu the first country of transit let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries, could not say, they couldn't dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do the minute the gas comes into the eu it is not eu gas and to be transferred for the. as we talked before about reversing the clothes from poland hungary to slovakia into ukraine that would not impossible in 2009 because of the regular structure that was in place. by working with europe to get the regulatory structure their making some investments, getting them to make investments in infrastructure their less reliant today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe there's more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> is a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe and with that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if w
a deal done with t-mobile. it's got to negotiate with budget telecom back in germany, t-mobile.of >> u.s. regulators seem to be the hurdle. i think back to the at&t deal in 2011, everyone thought it will pass but u.s. regulators stopped it. what is he thinking? at&t buying t-mobile is different from sprint brine t-mobile. at&t is one of the big dominant ones up there with verizon. they are one and two. three and four are a distant three and four. he said, you put three and four together, we are still going to struggle to compete with one and two. also if you have the comcast situation. in a lot of ways, all of this is coming together. cable companies and dish companies and phone companies are all becoming one. he is going to argue that the landscape is different and it was just a few years ago. >> so they are trying to piggyback on the comcast-time warner cable deal, hoping regulators will see it as the whole industry shaking up. >> there was the airline deal when american airlines merge with u.s. air. you ask how it is relevant. the regulators let a deal go through that a number of fo
about. >> we have more from germany, asia, and now a growing number from china. >> we'll looking at a closer look coming up. >>> plus paying for college football recruits. it's not the schools that are handing out the cash, but there is a problem on campus. we'll explain when real money continues. >> on techknow... >> these are some of the amazing spider goats >> small creatures, big impact >> how strong is it? >> almost as strong as steel >> inspiring discoveries changing lives >> this could go in a human body... >> right >> this is for an achilles tendon >> techknow every saturday go where science meets humanity >> this is some of the best driving i've ever done, even though i can't see techknow >> we're here in the vortex >> only on al jazeera america ra >> creating jobs is a huge ra priority for city and states trying to boost their economies offering tax incentives is how they lure companies . north carolina and the city of charlotte, attracting hundreds of foreign firms by offering them a home with plenty of skilled workers, transportation options and low cost of living
will be gone, it meant when russian exports gas into the e.u., the first country of transit, germany, ukraine or other e.u. countries, they cooperate dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do, the minute the gas comes into the e.u., it is now e.u. gas and can be transferred further. when we talked earlier about reversing the flows into ukraine, that would not have been possible in 2009 because of the regulatory structure that was in place. so by working with them to get the regulatory structure there, they are less relipet today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe, there is more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> forgive the pun, but? is it a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe, and would that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if we were able to do that. >> i think the unite
exports gas into the eu, the first country of transit, let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries could not -- they could not dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do is a minute a gas comes and it is eu gas and can be transferred further. we talked about reversing the flows from poland to hungary from slovakia into ukraine. that would not have been possible in 2000 nine because of the regulatory structure that was in place. i working with europe to get the regulatory structure there, making some investments and getting them to make investments in infrastructure, they are less reliant today. as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe emma there is more we can do together to make sure that that reliance is diminished and quite significantly. fors it a pipe dream americans who see themselves in anything like the near future europeng natural gas to and would that have any effect on our domestic market or do we have so much that it would ,imply mean a new market trades reduction in the investments if we were able to
's stronger than what france can do. it means that europe must have a strong growth everywhere, in germany, spain, uk, to go to converge to this target. >> do you think the french economy would be able to benefit from the growth from other countries? >> that's one of the targets of the plan is to say we tried to improve the company's situation and in that case, it will be both to capture the eurozone trajectory. that's the target of the government. >> phillip, when we tried to reform the french economy, there's always something funny or perhaps even worrying. the best reform in france is always the one that is not impacting myself. so french people are reluctant of the impact of the reform. >> it's mostly everywhere always the same thing. it's always better when your neighbor is changing its mind in this situation. what we see and what is important currently in france is that gdp per capita growth, it means that what you earn is what i lost. there's one winner, one loser. and that's why it's practically difficult at this moment of the cycle. that's why manuel vass ask ed, o try to make thi
if we have shown the stock, but you can see that trading slightly up, 31.02 is the number. and germany's british consumer giant ricket is said to be among the final contenders. merck's cop summer unit is best known for coppertoen sunscreen and claritin. >> for rickets. >> for rickets? >> yeah. >> thank you. i know where you are going with that. >> i'm not going anywhere. i missed you. i i am just glad you are here. i'm glad you are not in the seminary here, which would be a shocker. anyway, that was a big day. >>> we have another big deal. this is a european situation. >> you go up against the -- over here we might be a little bit nationalistic about some of our companies, like i didn't want the bacon. and bacon is like $12 a pound now. you don't have to say i was right about that, but we didn't want to sell smith view. nothing happens with the final say. >> it's always been that way in france. >> i know. i'm not surprised. >> this is just like welcome to france, welcome to the world. >> they didn't want to sell yogurt. now this is the crown jewel of the industrial -- do they have anyt
the atlant uk to help france defeat germany in world war i. 2,000 also marked into europe and music history, accompanied by their own jazz bands. for the war-weary french, the sound of jazz was a revelation, and an instant hit. many black american musicians tired of presently faced at home jumped at the chance to stay and dazzle a city where the colour lines are more fluent. guys found out there was a lot of gigs and plains. stuck. >> in the shadow. the basilica that dominates the skyline. jazz expatriots turned a hillside agency into a bastian of the roaring 20s. >> when you look at the pictures and the roof tops and club, that they were up, they must have been amazing to see true musicians coming awe the boat. and -- coming off the boat and ask and playing jazz. that must have been cool. >> the french are the biggest supporters of jazz. and that, for the most american of music forms. which is kind of crazy when you think about it. >> and no one was crazier on statement than a young american dancer josephine baker. >> she had escaped race riots and started her own riot when she opened the
audience for ge's ceo and a rival bid from germany's siemens. settles a remarkable three-day scramble. hans nichols is in berlin to break down oust him down -- break down alstom's choices. are they going to be open on friday? >> they will not be open until wednesday. they have until then to , oneerate over one bid formal offer. it comes down to one crucial question. here is the ceo of an american company. do you ask for permission from the french government first before putting out that big? jeff himmel had the conversations with alstom. his board has approved it. then the french government got wind of it. today, he has a meeting with french president for an swap along. -- francois hollande. did he oron there is, should he have contacted the french state before he started getting everything in line? what has happened in the meantime, siemens has put together a rival bid. this is an asset swap. siemens would take the energy unit from alstom and give them the train unit. they are prepared to make guarantees for no job cuts for at least three years. it would make france the leader of rail and
the japanese? >> the cold war line if your attacked by germany and russia, who do you shoot first? the answer was, germany, business before pleasure. not a very nice cold war story. >> ooh! >> that's hard to -- obviously these attitudes go way back and are very deep and action sir bait -- exacerbated by world war ii and nobody has been prepared to tell the entire truth about, forth ruthly in the region so it does have an overhang i think matters quite a lot. it means that the koreans and others are
growing up in america, growing up in the shadow of world war ii, germany, and i think he wanted to live a big american life after being in this divided, still divided country, and you think about how germany was led into world war ii. they were given stories. they were given a story about their ultimate fate as a people. they were going to, you know, proclaim a path of glory from their mythical origins and sort of have this revival, and by taking up the entire population in the narrative, this leader, crazy man, hitler, was able to motivate people in a way that their own just raw self-interests couldn't by making them talk to the grand opera. clark fooled me by making me a small town friend of the writer lieutenant of the crazy, ease centric millionaire and he knew he could sweep me up in the narrative, and i was ignoring consistencies along the way in order to live it out, and that was the gene yowrks and that's the yen yows of any great ma -- manipulator, to give you a narrative for the actions dm which you preserve at the cost of the ugly truth. >> walter's book is good about that de
quickly. you see some of the european economies are very tied to guest problems. germany has a pipeline underneath the baltics to connect directly to russia. i think that is one of the reasons you will see germany they do getnt -- their money from -- 40% of their gas from russia. the u.s. and russian economy is not nearly as integrated. there is certainly a love for he that it can cause us and european allies a lot of .inancial distress host: are we developing the infrastructure -- guest: i believe there are five or six lng terminal points. only one of those in louisiana is currently under construction. we are a long ways out from making the u.s. export industry to where we can help our allies in europe. opened a have recently liquefied terminal. we are equal to get fish eager get ---- we are eager to a lot of them are buying gas from russians. all of these countries are coming to us and saying, look, we are interested in buying energy resources but the problem is we are at least 10 years out from being able to fulfill the requests. host: we are talking with hannah thoburn from the fore
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)